Canadian Electrical Industry News Week

2015 CE Code ChangesPierre McDonald

There are so many revisions expected in the 2015 Edition of the Canadian Electrical Code (CE Code) that several articles have been required to help disseminate the information. My past articles have covered changes within the Definitions, Section 4, 12 and 18.

This month I’d like to focus on the changes beginning in Section 2 and moving through to Section 10. Specifically, this article will focus on those changes that affect the equipment installed and the way installers do their work.

Section 2
Rule 2-024 has always mandated that electrical equipment be approved. A certain amount of confusion existed with equipment located on the load side of overcurrent protection, transformers or current-limiting devices for Class 2 circuits. Does this equipment need to be approved or just be acceptable for the particular application? A new Subrule 2 to Rule 2-024 should clear up any confusion as it will specify that equipment described in Rule 16-222(1)(a) shall not be required to be approved. Of course, the authority having jurisdiction (AHJ) has the final say as to what equipment is approved or not.

A new rule will also appear in Section 2 regarding field installed warning and caution markings. Whenever the code requires field markings, they shall be written in the language or languages mandated by the AHJ adopting and enforcing the code. This would mean the labeling requirements of 2-306, Shock and arc flash protection, or 36-006, Warning notices, will be required to be in the languages mandated by the AHJ. This could include one or both of the official languages of Canada or even the four languages used in the Nunavut Territory depending on the jurisdiction where the installation occurs.

Another new rule destined for Section 2 will provide clarification with respect to electrical equipment ratings. Subrule 1 of this new rule provides for a safe installation by mandating electrical equipment marked with a short circuit current rating or with a withstand current rating meet the voltage and fault current available at the point of installation. Subrule 2 will require equipment marked with both the line-to-line voltage and the line-to-ground voltage to be connected only to circuits that are solidly grounded. Examples of these markings include 125/250V, 120/240V, 208Y/120V, 480Y/277V or 600Y/347V.

Rule 2-324 has been revised to stipulate the clearance between a combustible gas relief discharge device or vent and a source of ignition to be stipulated in CSA B149.1-10 Natural Gas and Propane Installation Code. This change will ensure that correlation now exists between the two codes. An Appendix B note to this rule will indicate that this clearance must be a minimum of 1m for natural gas and 3m for propane gas.

Section 6
Two changes are expected to the rules of Section 6. In Rule 6-114, the term “rain-tight” will be replaced with “suitable for use in wet location.” This change better aligns with recent changes to the product standard for Conduit, Tubing and Cable fittings, C22.2 No. 18.3. This change will also take place in Section 12.

Rule 6-402(2) is being revised to allow for supply service to be as high as 320A without current transformers provided the metre mounting device is equipped with by-pass means. These bypass-means associated with the 320A meter base allow for insertion and removal of the meter with no implications of an arc flash. This new requirement is especially good news for those installations with large heating and other loads where the alternative was always to install a transformer rated service.

Section 10
A number of rules have been changed in Section 10, with several of them now accepting “other than copper” as a bonding or grounding conductor depending on the rule which applies. “Other than copper” conductors include aluminum or a conductor resistant to any corrosive condition existing at the installation site or a conductor protected against corrosion. This change appears in Rules 10-402, 10-406, 10-626, 10-702, 10-802, 10-806, 10-812, 10-1000 and 10-1108.

Rule 10-106 has a Subrule 3 added which echoes the Appendix B note presently in the 2012 edition CE Code. This change effectively takes the information item from the appendix and creates a mandatory requirement by placing it in the rules.

Rule 10-208, Grounding connections for two or more buildings or structures supplied from a single service, has been changed to mandate that buildings housing livestock and supplied from distribution equipment must have non-current carrying metal parts of the electrical equipment bonded to ground with the bonding conductor run with feeder or branch circuit conductors supplying that building. In past editions of the CE Codes, the installer had the choice to use the bonding conductor of the feeder or establish a new ground with grounding electrodes and bonding the feeder neutral to ground. This practice will no longer be allowed, resulting in a reduction of stray voltages in buildings housing livestock.

A new Subrule 5 has been added to Rule 10-618, which requires a separate bonding conductor to bond fixed equipment to ground when single conductors are used and the metallic sheath has been isolated at one end in conformance with rule 4-010.

Rule 10-902 has been revised to simply require that the grounding conductor be attached to the electrode at a point that will ensure a permanent ground. If the electrode is a metallic water pipe in-situ type, then this connection must be as close as practical to the point where the pipe enters the building. In either case, where it is practical, this point of attachment should be accessible. As Rule 10-904 requirements have been rolled into the changes with Rule 10-902, Rule 10-904 will be deleted.

In Rule 10-906, the words “bonding connection” have been replaced with “bonding conductor.” This simple change now allows, in non-metallic wiring systems, one bonding conductor to be connected to the bonding screw at the back of a box, and then all bonding conductors entering the box can be twisted together under a wire nut. Prior to this change, all bonding conductors entering the box were required to be connected to individual bonding screws at the back of a box.

Finally, several rules within Section 10 have also been adjusted by deleting the term “mechanical injury” and replacing it with the term “mechanical damage.” This change fortifies the correct terminology in that equipment cannot be injured but it can be damaged.

The changes cited here are but a few of the many coming to the 2015 edition CE Code. While some are editorial, most will affect electrical installations in some way or another. Keep in mind that these changes only come in to effect once the particular AHJ has adopted this 2015 edition CE Code.


Pierre McDonald, CET, is Senior Regulatory Affairs Representative/Répresentant Principal, Affaires Réglementaires, Underwriters Laboratories of Canada Inc. Based in St. Albert, AB, Pierre has been a member of the Canadian Electrical Code Part 1 technical committee as well as several subcommittees including serving as Chair of Sections 6 and 76 and as a member representing regulators on several other CSA committees. Pierre is still active with code development and interpretation.

Changing Scene

  • Prev
Aspiring skilled trades participants recently descended upon annual Skills Competitions held in ...
Join WiRE and partners 20/20 Catalysts Program and the Aboriginal Apprenticeship Board of Ontario ...
A new program launched by Nova Scotia with federal government support will provide rebates of up to ...
The National Electrical Contractor Association announced on June 18 that Southwire has been ...
Located 160 kilometres west of the Porcupine mine in Chapleau, Ontario, Borden is set to be ...
  Schneider Electric, the leader in the digital transformation of energy management and ...
The 2018 IDEAL Nationals Championship is well underway across Canada. In fact, we have reached the ...
  Schneider Electric, the leader in the digital transformation of energy management and ...
 Electro-Federation Canada (EFC) announced the launch of its new brand identity last ...
WANTED: Skilled Electrician. Apprentice. or Team  Must be able to perform a simple wiring ...

Electrician Forum Brought to you by Schneider Electric

Schneider Electric

June 25, 2018

Sponsored by Schneider Electric

Today we are all concerned with the energy we consume within our homes. But how many truly understand the ins and outs of home energy use, and where exactly does the electrician and the development of energy management systems come into play. There is much to consider when discussing home energy use. The consumer first off needs to be informed about energy use, how it is calculated and ultimately billed if they are to make changes to their energy consumption rates. But in terms of educating consumers does the residential electrician have a role? And beyond that are manufacturers developing products designed to help electricians and consumers better understand residential energy use? Throughout this article we will deal with each of these important questions.

Read More

Codes and Regulations Brought to You by the CSA Group

  • Prev
In this article: Section 58 — Passenger Ropeways and Similar Equipment. Rule 58-000 ...
  Unauthorized CSA Group certification marks have been found on wiring by Triumph Cable ...
In this article: Section 52 — Diagnostic imaging installations. The CE code is a ...
In this article: Section 46 — Emergency Power Supply, Unit Equipment, Exit Signs, and ...
  In this article: Section 44 — Theatre Installations. The CE Code is a ...
CSA has published C22.2 No. 60947-7-3, the harmonized standard for low-voltage switchgear and ...
  Electric welders. The CE Code is a comprehensive document. Sometimes it can seem ...
  In this article: Section 40 — Electric cranes and hoists. The CE Code is a ...

 

Schneider

A new “future ready” circuit breaker from Schneider Electric is described by the company as the next generation of power distribution for the Internet of Things (IoT) era. Masterpact MTZ increases efficiency and can adapt to ever-evolving needs for safety, reliability and sustainability. The world is becoming more connected, electric, digitized, decarbonized, and decentralized, says Schneider Electric. Power distribution is facing new regulations, becoming more seamless and connected. 

Masterpact MTZ is the latest in a series of circuit breaker innovations, following Masterpact M, and then Masterpact NT/NW.

Read More



Tools for the Trade

  • Prev
  IDEAL Industries has introduced Combination Drill Taps to its tool lineup. Combining the ...
  Stripping and crimping device, 100 - 240 V input voltage, for insulated ferrules with a ...
Professional all-in-one cutter/stripper for coaxial and twisted pair cables     ...
  Klein Tools' Coax Explorrer 2 tests coaxial cable and maps up to 4 locations   ...
  Ideal Industries' T-14 wire stripper s are ideal for all professionals working within the ...
  The ATS850 conveyor eliminates all types of electro static discharge requirements. ...
  Lorik Tool & Automation has the experience and ability to manufacture a variety of ...
  Ideal Industries' 26 piece insulated Journeyman kit is ideal for new electricians or for ...
  Klein Tools Deluxe Fish Rod Set comes in 19 pieces that when assembled can fish wire and ...
  BendWorks Software was designed to help electrical contractors adopt this new process ...

Product News

  • Prev
  The DM62 measures AC/DC voltage, current (A, mA, μA), and resistance/continuity for ...
  LED Power • 100 Watt 12VDC Dimmable. AC Input Voltage: 120V 60 Hz. DC ...
  Slim LED area light Specification (200W/250W/300W/400W). Modular lens design, ...
  36lm per module. 8 modules per meter or 3 modules per foot. Maximum module ...
  The Wandering Star pendant light fixture wins the prestigious Red Dot award ...
  Bay Light Reflector Aluminum 60 Degree Beam      
  With a simple tap or swipe, the Interact Landmark Scene management app enables lighting ...
  Inline Speed Reducer - 2:1 Ratio, 7/8 in Input Size, C-Face Quilled Input Type, 7/8 in ...
  WEG has released the new generation of WEG Motors for heavy duty applications. ...
  Intelligent QUINT4 DC UPS, thanks to IQ Technology. You know the charging state and ...

 

Peers & Profiles

  • Prev
David Johns is a unique and dedicated individual both at home and in the workplace. At home he is a ...
    Sean Freeman is a vibrant, enthusiastic and selfless individual who has taken his ...
  Automation companies are drivers of innovation, and have penetrated near every industry ...
Total Electrical Solutions was founded in 2013 by Jeremy Herrington in Quispamsis, on the outskirts ...
Andrew MacLeod is a territory sales manager with Leviton Manufacturing of Canada in British ...
  Floyd Lau founded Amptek Technologies in 2002 as an end to end engineering design ...
Mike Marsh, President and CEO of SaskPower, has been a leading figure in Saskatchewan’s ...
Gordon MacDonald is a cheerful, driven individual who loves to be challenged, a trait that suits ...
  Most of us have a difficult enough time managing one job and a home life. However, some ...
  Since 2012 Barnstormer has advanced the abilities of their brewery with the installation ...

Copper $US Dollar price per pound


Jeremy Herrington

Total Electrical Solutions was founded in 2013 by Jeremy Herrington in Quispamsis, on the outskirts of Saint John, New Brunswick. Since 2013 Jeremy has steadily grown Total Electrical Solutions in the residential, commercial and construction sectors. The growth is primarily the result of Jeremy’s customer first philosophy, plus his over 20 years of industry experience.

Jeremy grew up learning about the industry from his father who was an electrical contractor. Jeremy spent his early years helping and watching his father as a contractor and business owner. After high school Jeremy was, like many, not wholly aware of the course he wished to take and so he began an electrical apprenticeship at his father’s company.

Read More

Kerrwil Publications

538 Elizabeth Street, Midland,Ontario, Canada L4R2A3 +1 705 527 7666
©2018 All rights reserved

Use of this Site constitutes acceptance of our Privacy Policy (effective 1.1.2016)
The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Kerrwil