Canadian Electrical Industry News Week

 

Oct 6, 2017

Bill BurrBy William (Bill) Burr

In this article: Section 58 — Passenger Ropeways and Similar Equipment. Rule 58-000 states that Section 58 is a supplementary or amendatory section of the code and applies to passenger ropeways as defined in the CSA Z98, Passenger Ropeways and Passenger Conveyers standard, which includes tramways, chairlifts, gondolas, surface ropeways, passenger conveyors, and similar equipment. In addition, ANSI B77.1, Passenger Ropeways – Aerial Tramways, Aerial Lifts, Surface Lifts, Tows and Conveyers - Safety Requirements, and Can/CSA-C22.3 No.1, Overhead Systems should be referenced.

 

 

Appendix B and the CE Code Handbook provide additional information.

Rule 58-002 provides special terminology definitions for Cabin, Messenger, Passenger Conveyor and Station.

General requirements

Rule 58-010 requires that, in addition to the spacing requirements of Rule 2-308, the headroom in working spaces around controllers, disconnecting means, and other electric equipment must be no less than 2.0 m. Part 2 of the rule provides that the requirements for headroom may be relaxed provided that

  • Only authorised persons have access to the area
  • The working space is kept clear of obstructions, and either
    • o live parts are guarded, isolated or insulated and the equipment can be examined, adjusted, serviced or maintained while energized without removing the protection, or
    • o a cautionary label advising that the equipment cannot be examined, adjusted, serviced, or maintained while energized is applied, or
    • o the applied voltage is equal or less than 30 V RMS or 42 V peak

Rule 58-012 specifies that circuits of less than 50 volts must be bonded to ground as per Rule 10-114.  Communication, control, remote control, monitoring, supervision, and signal circuits may be isolated, and grounded in accordance with Rule 10-206. The haul rope for these circuits may be isolated and ungrounded.

Rule 58-014 limits voltage for all circuits to 300 volts-to-ground except for

  • 750 volts-to-ground for motors, machine brakes, motor-generator sets, floodlighting, and heaters
  • 120 volts-to-ground for motor control circuits
  • 48 volts-to-ground for communication, control, remote control, monitoring, supervision, and signal circuits except for hand-crank-type telephone signal bell circuits
  • 30 volts-to-ground or 40 volts-to-ground peak for aerial conductors carried between towers that support the passenger ropeway, except hand-crank-type telephone signal bell circuits

Rule 58-016 provides that luminaires for night skiing or similar floodlighting applications may be installed on passenger ropeway towers and stations if there is a circuit breaker, installed in a lockable enclosure that disconnects all ungrounded conductors, and that each circuit to the luminaires is protected by a ground fault circuit interrupter (Class A GFCI).

Conductors

Rule 58-102 specifies that the minimum size of conductors for all communication, control, remote control, monitoring, supervision, and signal circuits shall be No. 26 AWG copper, except for circuits contained in travelling cables where the minimum size must be No. 20 AWG.

Rule 58-104 permits that

  • optical fibre cables, shielded cables, and conductors for operating devices, power, motor, heating, air conditioning, operating, signal, communication, control, safety, fire alarm, and lighting circuits may be grouped in raceway systems or travelling cables, providing the insulation rating for each conductor is not less than the conductor with the maximum circuit voltage
  • optical fibre cables, shielded cables, and conductors for operating devices, operating, signal, communication, control, safety, and fire alarm circuits may be run in the same aerial cable, providing that the insulation rating for each conductor is not less than the conductor with the maximum circuit voltage

Note that optical fibre cables include conductive, non-conductive and hybrid types as defined in Rule 56-102.

Wiring methods

Rule 58-200 outlines acceptable wiring methods in passenger ropeways and similar equipment:

  • Generally, all conductors, including optical fibre cables in machinery spaces, control spaces, in or on cabins, in machine rooms and control rooms must be installed in rigid metal conduit, EMT, rigid PVC conduit or wireways, except for travelling cables connecting the movable drive carriage or movable return carriage.
  • In addition, the following wiring methods may be used:
    • o mineral-insulated cable
    • o aluminum-sheathed cable
    • o armoured cable
    • o cable trays installed in accordance with Rules 12-2200 to 12-2210
    • o flexible conduit or liquid-tight flexible conduit between raceways and limit switches, interlocks, operating devices, or similar devices
    • o flexible conduit or liquid-tight flexible conduit between control panels and motors, machine brakes, motor-generator sets, disconnecting means, or pumping unit motors and valves
    • o jacketed cables installed between raceways and signal equipment and between raceways and operating devices where mechanical protection is provided and where the cables are supported including:
      • cables used in Class 1 extra-low voltage and Class 2 low-energy circuits, including but not limited to travelling cables connecting the movable carriage or movable return carriage
      • extra-low-voltage control cable
      • communication cable
      • fire alarm and signal cable
      • multi-conductor thermoplastic-insulated cable
      • hard-usage and extra-hard-usage cables
      • auxiliary gutters between controllers, starters, and similar apparatus
      • jacketed flexible cords and cables used in extra-low-voltage circuits (30 V or less), not greater than 2 m in length, supported and provided with mechanical protection

Rule 58-202 requires that supports for travelling cables be located and provided with suitable guards to prevent damage to the cables and contact with other equipment.

Protection and control

Rule 58-300 requires that motor control devices be arranged, as per rules 28-312 and 28-400, to prevent automatic restarting after shutdown where restarting could cause injury to persons.

Rule 58-302 provides that disconnecting means for the ungrounded conductors of the main drive motor and auxiliary drive motor, including their ventilation and control circuits, for each passenger ropeway or passenger conveyor must not contain a provision to automatically close the disconnecting means, and must be

  • a single disconnect which also disconnects power to the driving machine brake(s) control circuit directly or through an auxiliary contact that is positively opened mechanically (the opening not being solely dependent on springs)
  • an externally operated fusible switch or a circuit breaker, capable of being locked in the open position, and clearly labelled describing the connected load
  • readily accessible to authorized persons and located where it is visible on entry to the control room or machinery area
  • provided with a sign to identify the location of the supply side overcurrent protective device
  • a single disconnect for motors and control circuits of multiple driving machines or motors connected to a single passenger ropeway or passenger conveyor

Rule 58-304 provides that disconnecting means for utilization equipment must be

  • a single disconnect for all ungrounded conductors
  • capable of being locked in the open position and located in the machine room, control room, machine space, or control space
  • provided with a sign to identify the location of the supply side overcurrent protective device

Rule 58-306 requires that overcurrent protection be coordinated with any upstream overcurrent protective devices.

Rule 58-308 requires that every 125 V, single-phase receptacle installed in machine rooms, control rooms, machine spaces, control spaces, and counterweight enclosures be protected with a Class A type ground fault circuit interrupter.

Rule 58-310 specifies that motor controllers be rated to comply with Rule 28-500(1) except where the controller limits the available power and is labelled “power limited”. 

Branch circuits

Rule 58-400 requires that each machine room, control room, machinery space, and control space must have

  • luminaires, not supplied from the load side of the ground fault circuit interrupters required by Rule 58-308, and controlled by lighting switches within easy reach of the point of entry
  • a 125 V, single-phase, duplex receptacle, having a configuration in accordance with Diagram 1
  • a separate branch circuit for the supply of luminaires and receptacles

Rule 58-402 requires that where counterweights are installed in a building or room, luminaires, not supplied from the load side of the ground fault circuit interrupters required by Rule 58-308, must be provided and a separate branch circuit must supply lighting and receptacles.

Rule 58-404 specifies that utilization equipment other than that identified in rules 58-400 and 58-402, must be supplied by a separate branch circuit with overcurrent devices located in the machinery room, control room, machinery space or control space.

Regenerative power

Rule 58-500 requires that means must be provided to absorb regenerative power that cannot be absorbed under overhauling load or braking conditions.

In the next installment, we will be discussing Section 60 — Electrical Communications Systems.

The source for this series of articles is the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, published by CSA. Note the CEC Handbook is also published by CSA.

William (Bill) Burr is the former Chair of the Canadian Advisory Council on Electrical Safety (CACES), former Director of Electrical and Elevator Safety for the Province of BC, and former Director of Electrical and Gas Standards Development and former Director of Conformity Assessment at CSA Group. Bill can be reached at Burr and Associates Consulting; billburr@gmail.com

 

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Electrical Industry Newsweek

This special weekly newsletter has the broadest reach of those that are involved in all aspects of the electrical industry including electrical construction and maintenance professionals and electrical specifying engineers across Canada. EIN is designed to provide electrical professionals’ insight and intelligence on those developments in the industry that effect design, specification, installation of electrical equipment. From corporate news to new technologies and insightful opinions EIN will become your first read in the electrical industry in Canada. Published weekly – every Tuesday
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