Canadian Electrical Industry News Week

 

Dec 10, 2018

Bill BurrBy William (Bill) Burr

The Code is a comprehensive document. Sometimes it can seem quite daunting to quickly find the information you need. This series of articles provides a guide to help users find their way through this critical document. This is not intended to replace the notes in Appendix B or the explanations of individual requirements contained in the CEC Handbook** but will hopefully provide some help in navigating, while reading the code.

The 24th Edition of the CE-C, Part I, (C22.1-18)* is now available from CSA Group. This discussion of Section 78 — Marine Wharves, Docking Facilities, Fixed and Floating Piers, and Boathouses is based on the new edition.

In this article: Tables — Part B. This section of the Code contains 99 tables of essential information that is referenced by various Rules of the Code. Tables referenced by Rules are considered normative (mandatory) elements of the Code. Note that the D tables of tabulated information in Appendix D are considered non-normative (non-mandatory) elements. The tables are in numerical order based on when that table was included in the Code. Since this is a large section it will be discussed in two parts. This is Part B covering Tables 36 to 69.

Tables 36A and 36B, referenced by Rule 4-004, provide maximum allowable ampacities for aluminum and copper conductor, respectively, neutral supported cables, based on phase conductor size, and type.

Table 37, referenced by, Rule 28-104, provides motor supply conductor minimum temperature rating based on, an ambient temperature of 30 degrees centigrade, type of motor enclosure, and class rating of the insulation.

Table 38, referenced by Rules 8-202 to 8-210 provides the demand factors for electric vehicle supply equipment, based on the number of automobile spaces or stalls per feeder, and the maximum load in watts per space or stall.

Table 39, referenced by Rule 4-004 (22), provides the minimum permitted service conductors (based on Tables 2 and 4), for 3-wire 120/240 V and 120/208 V for single dwellings and feeder conductor or cable size supplying single dwelling units of row housing, apartment, or similar buildings and terminating on equipment having a conductor termination temperature of not less than 75 °C, and based on the overcurrent device rating, calculated loads, and conductor size for copper or aluminum. Note that this table applies only to conductors sized for loads calculated in accordance with Rules 8-200(1) (a), 8-200 (2), or 8-202 (1).

Table 40, referenced by Rule 12-1006, provides the number of external threads per 25.4 mm (inch), and minimum and maximum length of thread in millimetres per trade size of rigid metal conduit.


Table 41, referenced by Rules 10-614 and 70-126, provides the minimum size of bonding jumper for service raceways per the ampacity of the largest service conductor or equivalent multiple conductors, for either copper or aluminum.

Table 42 is deleted.

Table 43, referenced by Rule 10-102, provides the minimum bare copper conductor size for concrete-encased electrodes, based on the ampacity of the largest service conductor or equivalent multiple conductors.

Table 44, referenced by Rules 8-010 and 28-704, provides full load current for three-phase AC motors by motor rating in horsepower, per rated voltage, and per induction type, squirrel-cage and wound rotor motors, or synchronous type unity power factor motors.


Table 45, referenced by Rules 28-010 and 28-704, provides the full load current for single-phase AC motors by horsepower per 115 or 230 volts.


Table 46 has been moved and is now Diagram 1.

Table 47 has been moved and is now Diagram 2.

Table 48, referenced by Rule 70-104, provides the minimum trade size of conduit for mobile homes per rating of the main overcurrent protection device and whether the system ground is excluded or included.

Table 49, has been moved and is now Diagram 3.

Table 50, referenced by Rule 26-250, for transformers provides the percentage of maximum setting or rating of the primary and secondary overcurrent protection device per the rated impedance of the transformer.

Table 51, referenced by Rules 36-300, 36-308 and Appendix B, provides the minimum size of bare copper grounding conductors for a high-voltage installation, based on the maximum available short-circuit current, the maximum fault duration, and whether the joint is brazed, made by an exothermic weld, compression or bolted joint.

Table 52, referenced by Rules 36-304, 36-306, 36-308, 36-310, and 36-312, provides tolerable touch and step voltages, based on type of ground, soil resistivity in ohms per meter, and fault duration.

Table 53, referenced by Rule 12-012, provides minimum cover requirements in millimeters for direct buried cables or insulated conductors in raceways, based on wiring method, and whether installed in vehicular or non-vehicular areas.


Table 54 has been moved and is now Diagram 4.

Table 55 has been moved and is now Diagram 5.

Table 56, referenced by Rule 2-308, provides the minimum working space around electrical equipment having exposed live parts, based on the nominal voltage to-ground.

Table 57, referenced by Rule 16-210 (6) and Table 5A, provides allowable ampacities for Class 2 copper conductors based on the size of conductor and whether it is a single conductor in free air, or not more than three copper conductors in raceway or cable, and an ambient temperature of 30 degrees centigrade. Where there are more than three conductors in raceway, use the derating factors provided by column 3.

Table 58, referenced by Rule 40-002, for short-time-rated crane and hoist motors, provides ampacities for up to four insulated copper conductors in raceway or cable for the operating temperature and duration, at an ambient temperature of 30 degrees centigrade. For five or more power conductors in raceway or cable, the ampacities shown in this table are reduced by 80%. For ambient temperatures over 30 degrees centigrade, apply the derating factors in Table 5A.

Table 59, referenced by Rule 60-704, provides the minimum size of protector grounding conductors for communications systems, based on the maximum number of protected circuits, and whether they are fused or fuseless.

Table 60, referenced by Rule 16-330, provides allowable ampacities for copper, eight-conductor, Class 2 power and data communication circuit cables, based on conductor and cable size, and number of cables in a bundle.

Table 61, referenced by Rule 68-056, provides the minimum horizontal separation from pools of buried cable, depending on the type of installation (communication or power) and, whether the cable is direct buried unjacketed with bare neutral, cables with a semi-conducting jacket, cables with a non-conducting jacket, or conductors in non-conducting ducts.
Table 62, referenced by Rules 38-013 (2) and 38-014, provides feeder demand factors for elevators, based on the number of elevators on a single feeder.


Table 63, referenced by Rule 20-034, outlines the hazardous areas for propane dispensing, container filling, and storage, based on location, extent of the hazardous location, and the Group IIA hazardous location.


Table 64, referenced by Rules 20-062 and J20-062, outlines the hazardous locations at NGV fuelling facilities, based on location, and the extent of the hazardous location zone or division.

Table 65, referenced by Rules 2-400 and 2-402, provides the enclosure selection table for non-hazardous locations, based on the degree of protection against the environmental conditions, the enclosure type, and whether its for indoor only or Indoor/outdoor use.

Table 66, referenced by Rule 4-004 (22), provides ampacities for bare or covered conductors in free air, based on 40 degrees centigrade ambient temperature, 80 degrees centigrade total conductor temperature, and 610 millimetres per second wind velocity, for both copper and aluminum conductors.

Table 67, referenced by Rule 62-200, provides the minimum clearance requirements for installed space heating systems, based on type of heating system and location, and the types of obstructions and protrusions.

Table 68, referenced by Rule 8-102, provides the maximum insulated conductor length, for 120 V single-phase circuits in dwelling units, measured from the supply side of the consumer’s service to the furthest point of utilization, on a circuit using 90-degree centigrade rated copper insulated conductors, at 30 degrees centigrade ambient temperature, based on size of conductor and overcurrent protection rating.


Table 69, referenced by Rule 20-202, outlines hazardous locations at bulk storage plants, by location, extent of the hazardous location, and the zone of the hazardous location.

In the next instalment, we will be discussing the Diagrams and the Appendices Sections of the Code.

* The source for this series of articles is the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, (C22.1-18) published by CSA.

** Note the CEC Handbook is also published by CSA.

William (Bill) Burr is the former Chair of the Canadian Advisory Council on Electrical Safety (CACES), former Director of Electrical and Elevator Safety for the Province of BC, and former Director of Electrical and Gas Standards Development and former Director of Conformity Assessment at CSA Group. Bill can be reached at Burr and Associates Consulting billburr@gmail.com.

 

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