Canadian Electrical Industry News Week

Mar 11, 2019

Lighting Control IntegrationBy Kevin Willmorth

The Internet of Things (IoT) has become the talk of technologists everywhere, on every product level imaginable. Lighting is no exception. Understanding why this is such an energetic field requires thinking beyond conventional control and connectivity models. The integration of smart features opens the door to intelligent utilization of data and energy that cannot be achieved using closed, localized technologies that cannot be accessed beyond their limited utilitarian functionality.

To gain an understanding of the power of intelligence and data sharing, one must realize how many opportunities are being missed with existing system architectures. As a prime example, lighting equipment is ubiquitous to the built environment. Anywhere there are human beings doing work, there will be lighting systems made up of luminaires, sensors and controls. These are now managed in an encapsulated universe, connected only within the local context. Other systems, such as HVAC, computer networks, security, scheduling, and data collection, are also operating within their own closed bubbles, using controls and sensing topology that overlap one another. This produces redundancies that increase installed cost and lost opportunities to extract valuable information that can be used to improve the environment for those being served.

The IoT is a foundation of load control, data collection, and interpolation across a wide range of disparate devices, with minimal redundancy. Lighting equipment is a natural platform for integrating sensors that collect occupancy, footfall monitoring, temperature, natural light availability, and safety event monitoring. Additionally, through the integration of LiFi (light-based data communication), lighting can also serve as a communications platform to smart devices, HVAC control, data collection nodes, as well as sensor, load and controls system commissioning. Further, BLE (Bluetooth low energy) and WiFi networks, PoE (Power over Ethernet), low voltage and self-powered controls, produce opportunities for building system intelligence collection. The IoT pulls this together under a larger umbrella, or cloud, that supports application of smart software to enhance the human experience, while delivering usable data to those interested in delivering fresh new products, building design features, work environment conditions, shopping experiences, and living comfort.

At home, the IoT will provide homeowners real-time information on the condition of stored foods, state of security, use of energy, status of warranties for products in use, maintenance due on automobiles and appliances, as well as lighting and HVAC control. This will grow rapidly, as the number of consumer devices purchased with IoT capability are purchased to replace older hardware, waiting to be activated when the homeowner is ready to avail themselves of the opportunity.

In commercial application, the opportunities are even further reaching. Restaurants will have the capacity to easily track and manage perishable goods, evaluate customer behaviours and preferences, track profits in real-time, manage facilities, organize menus, even communicate menus directly to smart devices, take orders that are directly sent to kitchen management, and track satisfaction at multiple locations seamlessly. The connection between consumer product searching online, bricks and mortar retailers, wholesale suppliers, and manufacturers, through the IoT means that fewer products sit on shelves, and fewer customers are left without a supply of desired items. Health care and educational facilities operators will find even more opportunities where data and light become inseparable.

While many of these concepts have been accomplished with closed proprietary data systems within large scale entities, the layers of redundancy remain. Even among those with sophisticated market data intelligence, use of internal inter-connectivity between building systems and distant facilities is essentially nonexistent. By including smart features within equipment, lighting and control devices, security, network systems and communications platforms, the IoT not only delivers access to data for the organization’s products but transforms operation of facilities as well.

Lighting equipment is of particular interest in this nascent stage of the deployment of the IoT. Lighting equipment is not only universal to all occupied space, it is powered and of a scale that can absorb additional sensor and communication technology, at a reasonable delivered cost. From this portal to cloud based data, other devices can be added and integrated. Lighting controls being activated are now a request for service that delivers light, as well as changes in temperature, shade setting, while identifying of occupant activity for use by operations management.

While the IoT promises to advance human experience and provide marketers data they need, there remain two critical issues to be addressed. The first concern over broad inter-connectivity and availability of data is system security. For the IoT to be practical, all connected components must be made available for their intended purpose, with security features that blocks exploitation by those who would use access to do harm. The second concern is the planned obsolescence, where devices are sent a “discontinue service” instruction, requiring replacement to continue functionality. Both of these are being addressed by IoT developers, who understand that without the willing participation of customers the concept will fail. Additionally, when IoT enabled devices rely heavily on web-based connections to function, the stability of Internet connections becomes a critical design consideration. The most reliable systems include local operational functionality whenever web-based communications are off line. For lighting, this is a critical feature, as having operations disrupted until internet service is restored is an unacceptable failure state.

While the marketing energy behind the deployment of the IoT would make it appear it will be universally deployed in a very short period of time, concerns over security, operational functionality, product interfaces, unscrupulous marketer vulnerabilities, and deployment of universal communications protocols will have a damping effect. However, the opportunity for revenue generation, as well as potential for delivering improvements in operations, as well as human experience of our built environment, is too great to dismiss. For these reasons, the IoT will eventually be a presence in lighting and daily life equal to, and in concert with, the smart phones now accepted as necessary technology.

Kevin Willmorth has been involved with lighting since 1981. His experience includes electrical system design, lighting design consulting, product design, marketing, business strategy, and editorial writing. His past positions include positions include owner of a lighting design consultancy, VP of Design and Marketing for Kim, Winona, and Visa Lighting, VP and Director of Product Management Renaissance Lighting, and VP of Design – Lighting for Atlandia Design. He currently owns Lumenique, LLC, offering product design, prototype development, testing, and strategic consulting to manufacturers, application design and technology evaluation for building owners, and Tasca, a small industrial task lighting manufacturing firm. He is also Editor for SSL content in all Construction business media publications including Architectural SSL, Architectural Products, NZB, and Illuminate; kwillmorth@lumenique.com; www.lumenique.com

This article was first published online by the Lighting Controls Association.

Photo source: Daintree

AD Spotlight                                                                                                            

Changing Scene

  • Prev
EFC’s exciting new product section on Electric Vehicle Systems conducted its first face-to-face ...
Canadian battery material specialist Hydro-Québec partners with Mercedes-Benz AG as part ...
Employer response to emerging technologies’ impact on the electricity sector workforce is critical ...
The National Electrical Manufacturers Association (NEMA) has published two new standards on ...
This fall, Canada's elite electricians and apprentices will be heading to Nashville, Tennessee for ...
The Electrical industry is “Powering a Changing World” in areas such as digitization, ...
Prior to joining ABB in 2017 as Executive Vice President of the Electrification business, Deschenes ...
The Canadian Apprenticeship Forum-Forum Canadien sur l’Apprentissage (CAF-FCA) has announced ...
The Support Equity and Under-Represented Groups project will address the under-representation of ...

SIemens Light+BuildingAt this year’s Light+Building trade fair, Siemens will showcase its vision for transforming today’s passive buildings into learning and adaptive environments that intelligently interact with people. The company’s focus at this year’s show is “Building the future today”, outlining the innovations that will make this possible. These include cloud-based technologies, digital planning, occupant-centric building automation and services. New solutions for smart electrical infrastructure that seamlessly connects to the Internet of Things (IoT) are also at the core of this transformation.

Read More

 

 

 

Michelle BraniganBy Michelle Branigan

We are in an Age of Disruption. Extant and emerging technologies are driving significant evolution in the way work is done across all sectors of Canada’s economy and no industry, including electricity, will be immune.

Think of the technologies and businesses that have changed the way we live, work and connect with each other. Uber. Airbnb. Spotify. Facebook. Twitter. Duolingo. The list is long and what’s fascinating is that these are companies that did not exist 20 years ago. Yet these are common words in our lexicon today.

Read More

 

 

Product News

  • Prev
The LED filament lamps distinguish themselves by their sparkling white light, blending perfectly ...
Stanpro offers a wide range of Linear Fluorescent lamps for all lighting applications and needs. ...
This modern design series is a family of highly efficient and powerful LED flood lights and area ...
Our new 60W and 100W Temporary LED High Bays are the ideal substitute for traditional 250W and 400W ...
These high quality luminaires are equipped with a frosted lens that diffuses the light comfortably. ...
Arlington’s #300 non-metallic cable strap offers the easy way to attach flat NM cable to concrete ...
EiKO's Emergency Batery Kit is an LED emergency driver that allows the same LED fixture to be used ...
The LED Gimbal High Output downlight combines a sleek design with a small aperture without any ...
LPDL (Low Profile Downlight) gives you all the flexibility you need during installation, especially ...
Lumenwerx is pleased to announce the launch of a new suite of acoustic luminaires to reduce ambient ...

 

Lumenwerx AcoustixLumenwerx is pleased to announce the launch of a new suite of acoustic luminaires to reduce ambient noise – ACOUSTIX family.

Developed in conjunction with acoustics experts, the new ACOUSTIX family of luminaires combines exceptional optics and precision sound absorbing technology to create a new paradigm in acoustic lighting. The lineup’s flagship fixture, the Audia, can increase sound absorption up to 30% more than competing products.

 

 

Read More

 

 

Peers & Profiles

  • Prev
Tommy Carducci is a 14-year industry veteran working with Seneca Electrical and was one of 18 ...
Legend Power Systems is an innovative Canadian company headquartered out of Vancouver, B.C. Their ...
Founded in 1942, Franklin Empire is Canada’s largest independent electrical distributor.   ...
Nick Foster is Territory Manager, New Brunswick & P.E.I for Leviton. Foster was recently ...
Held from November 7th to 9th in Orlando, Florida and aired on ESPN 2, the Ideal National ...
Headquartered in Vancouver, Legend Power Systems is a global onsite energy management technology ...
LDS caught up with General Manager of EiKO’s Canadian division, Stephen Lee who was kind enough ...
“I had an awesome time, it was a lot of fun,” said Zach Agombar, who competed his way to 8th place ...
Held from November 7th to 9th in Orlando, Florida, and recently aired on ESPN 2, the Ideal National ...
Panel Upgrade Experts is an electrical contracting company started seven years ago by Paul ...

 

Leviton Nick FosterBy Blake Marchand

Nick Foster is Territory Manager, New Brunswick & P.E.I for Leviton. Foster was recently appointed as the Atlantic Regional Chair for Electro-Federation Canada’s (EFC) Young Professional Network (YPN).

Nick joins newly appointed National Chair, Sean Bernard of Ideal Industries, Ontario Region Chair, Joanna Kwant of Gerrie Electric, and Quebec Region Chair, Jean-Francois Gravel also with Leviton.

 

 

Read More

 

 

Copper $US Dollar price per pound

Kerrwil Publications Great Place to Work. Certified December 2019 - December 2020

538 Elizabeth Street, Midland,Ontario, Canada L4R2A3 +1 705 527 7666
©2020 All rights reserved

Use of this Site constitutes acceptance of our Privacy Policy (effective 1.1.2016)
The material on this site may not be reproduced, distributed, transmitted, cached or otherwise used, except with the prior written permission of Kerrwil