Wieland Device Provides Sensorless Monitoring of Single-Phase, Three-Phase or DC Motors

September 28, 2016

Wieland Electric Inc. has expanded its product line of machine safety devices with a sensorless standstill monitor compatible with all types of motors. The DIN rail mounted SVM4001K Series standstill monitor uses electromagnetic feedback, or back EMF, technology to provide machine safety engineers with a sensorless method of detecting motion in virtually all types of machinery applications, including high-speed rollers, slitters and winding equipment.

The SVM4001K Series standstill monitor is rated for 690V and frequencies up to 5kHz. It is compatible with single-phase and three-phase AC motors, DC motors, and variable frequency drive and servo-driven motors. The monitor module features selectable voltage thresholds and programmable time delays, enabling machine safety engineers to customize the device to their particular application. The module can be configured to monitor the motor’s rotation and control solenoid-actuated interlocks on mechanical safety systems.

“The SVM4001K Series is ideal for new or retrofit safety applications on equipment and does not require the use of external sensors or pulsed inputs to monitor the motion,” says Nick Styler, Safety Specialist at Wieland Electric. “Sensorless standstill monitors are ideal for many machine safety applications, delivering significant cost and reliability advantages. They provide a means for sensorless, automatic monitoring of almost all types of motor technologies without the need for mechanically modifying the machinery itself, resulting in simplified wiring, lower installed cost, and reduced machine downtime.”

The Wieland SVM4001K Series standstill monitors are cULus rated for use in both Canada and the U.S., and can be used in safety-oriented applications up to PL e / Category 4 according to EN ISO 13849-1 and SIL 3 according to EN 62061.

Housed in a narrow 22.5mm DIN rail mounted module, the SVM4001K series standstill monitors are available with either screw clamp or cage clamp terminals and feature a four-LED status display.

Find out more: www.wieland-safety.com/SVM4001.

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