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B.C. Electrical Code, 2021 Edition Comes into Effect October 1, 2022

EIN 21 TSBC EJTC 400

September 1, 2022

Effective October 1, 2022 the Canadian Electrical Code, Part I, 25th Edition, Safety Standard for Electrical Installations, Canadian Standards Association Standard C22.1-21 is adopted as the BC Electrical Code. All electrical work that is subject to the BC Electrical Code must be in compliance with the updated edition effective November, 30, 2022. 

All code-related information bulletins and directives that have been issued to date remain in effect. All potentially impacted information bulletins and directives will be reviewed for consistency with the new code edition and revised if necessary. If you have any questions about the new code edition or are interested in conversations with the Technical Safety BC community, register now to get involved.  

The new edition of BC Electrical Code will make one deviation from the Canadian Electrical Code: subrules 7 and 8 of Rule 66-456 (Section 66) will not be in force in BC. 

Transition for installation permits 

  • Except as provided below, work performed under installation permits issued prior to October 1, 2022, must comply with the 2018 (24th) edition until the work is completed (i.e., even if the work is completed after October 1, 2022). All work done under this scenario must be in compliance with the 2018 edition. Mixing select sections between editions is not permitted.  
  • Work performed under installation permits issued before October 1, 2022 may comply with the 2021 (25th) edition of the code, provided that the work will be completed after October 1, 2022 and the licensed electrical contractor has declared that the 2021 edition will be followed on the permit application. As above, mixing select code sections between editions is not permitted. This transition period will end November 30, 2022. 
  • All work performed under permits issued after November 30, 2022 must comply with the 2021 (25th) edition without exception. 

Contractors who obtain permits from delegated local governments should familiarize themselves with local government policies regarding transition.    

Copies of the Canadian Electrical Code, 25th edition, may be purchased from multiple sources. Under the Safety Standards Act, section 24, it is the responsibility of licensed contractors to maintain current knowledge of all relevant safety information, including codes and standards. Holders of operating permits also have that responsibility under section 28. Both licensed contractors and operating permit holders must ensure that individuals in their employ (i.e., who are performing regulated work) are also current with respect to code knowledge. 

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